Nell K. Duke

Nell K. Duke was a professor of teacher education and educational psychology, an affiliate of the program in school psychology, and co-director of the Literacy Achievement Research Center (LARC) at Michigan State University. She is currently a professor of literacy, language, and culture and faculty associate in the combined program in education and psychology at the University of Michigan, and a member of the International Reading Association Literacy Research Panel. Duke received her Bachelor’s degree from Swarthmore College and her Masters and Doctoral degrees from Harvard University. Duke’s work focuses on early literacy development, particularly among children living in poverty. Her specific areas of expertise include development of informational reading and writing in young children, comprehension development and instruction in early schooling, and issues of equity in literacy education. She currently serves as Co-Principal Investigator on projects funded by the Institute of Education Sciences, the National Science Foundation, and the Spencer Foundation. Duke is the recipient of the American Educational Research Association Early Career Award, the Literacy Research Association Early Career Achievement Award, the International Reading Association Dina Feitelson Research Award, the National Council of Teachers of English Promising Researcher Award, and the International Reading Association Outstanding Dissertation Award. She is author and co-author of numerous journal articles and book chapters as well as the books Reading and Writing Informational Text in the Primary Grades: Research-Based PracticesLiteracy and the Youngest Learner: Best Practices for Educators of Children from Birth to FiveBeyond Bedtime Stories: A Parent’s Guide to Promoting Reading, Writing, and Other Literacy Skills From Birth to 5; and her most recent book, Reading and Writing Genre with Purpose in K–8 ClassroomsShe is also editor of The Research-Informed Classroom book series and co-editor of the book Literacy Research Methodologies. Duke teaches preservice, inservice and doctoral courses in literacy education, speaks and consults widely on literacy education, and is an active member of several literacy-related organizations. She has served as author and consultant on a number of educational programs, including Buzz About ITiOpenersNational Geographic Science K-2 and the DLM Express. Duke also has a strong interest in improving the quality of educational research training in the U.S.
Select Ongoing Projects:

References:
*  Denotes a refereed publication. 
LARC PublicationsDuke, N. K. (in press). Foreword. In (Eds.), Best Practices in Literacy Instruction, 4th Edition. New York: Guilford.

Duke, N. K., & Martin, N. M. (in press). 10 things every literacy educator should know about research. To appear in The Reading Teacher.

Roberts, K. L., Christ, T., Duke, N. K., Martin, N. M., & Reynolds, J. M. (in press). Research worth knowing about: Four recently-published studies. To appear in Michigan Reading Journal.

* Zhang, S., & Duke, N. K. (in press). The impact of instruction in the WWWDOT Framework on students’ disposition and ability to evaluate websites as sources of information. To appear in The Elementary School Journal.

Duke, N. K., & Carlisle, J. F. (2011). The development of comprehension. In M. L. Kamil, P. D. Pearson, E. B. Moje, and P. Afflerbach (Eds.), Handbook of Reading Research, Vol. IV (pp. 199-228). London: Routledge.

 

Martin, N. M., & Duke, N. K. (2011). Interventions to enhance informational text comprehension. In R. Allington & A. McGill-Franzen (Eds.), Handbook of Reading Disabilities Research (345-361). London: Routledge.

Martin, N. M., Duke, N. K., Christ, T., & Reynolds, J. M. (2010). Research worth knowing about. Michigan Reading Journal, 42(3), 48-52. [Note: This is a reprint, with an added introduction, of Duke, Martin, Christ, & Reynolds, 2010; Martin, Duke, Christ, & Reynolds, 2010; and Christ, Martin, Duke, & Reynolds, 2010.]

Christ, T., Martin, N. M., Duke, N. K., & Reynolds, J. M. (2010). Research worth knowing about: Three recently-published studies. News and Views on Reading, 54(2), 19-20.

Duke, N. K. (2010). The real-world reading and writing U.S. children need. Phi Delta Kappan, 91(5), 68-71.

Duke, N. K., & Roberts, K. M. (2010). The genre-specific nature of reading comprehension. In D. Wyse, R. Andrews, & J. Hoffman (Eds.), The Routledge International Handbook of English, Language and Literacy Teaching (74-86). London: Routledge.

Martin, N. M., Duke, N. K., Christ, T., & Reynolds, J. M. (2010). Research worth knowing about: Three recently-published studies. News and Views on Reading, 54(1), 17-18.

Roberts, K. M., & Duke, N. K. (2010). Comprehension in the elementary grades: The research base. In K. Ganske & D. Fisher (Eds.), Comprehension across the curriculum: perspectives and practices K-12 (pp. 23-45). New York: Guilford Press.

Duke, N. K., & Billman, A. K. (2009). Informational text difficulty for beginning readers. To appear in E. H. Hiebert & M. Sailors (Eds.), Finding the right texts for beginning and struggling readers: Research-based solutions (pp. 109-128). New York: Guilford.

Duke, N. K., Martin, N. M., Christ, T., & Reynolds, J. M. (2009). Research worth knowing about: Three recently-published studies. News and Views on Reading, 53(3), 19-20.

Pressley, M., Duke, N. K., Gaskins, I. W., Fingeret, L., Halladay, J., Hilden, K., Park, Y., Zhang, S., Mohan, L., Reffitt, K., Bogaert, L. R., Reynolds, J., Golos, D., Solic, K., & Collins, S. (2009). Working with struggling readers: Why we must get beyond the Simple View of Reading and visions of how it might be done. In T. B. Gutkin & C. R. Reynolds (Eds.), The Handbook of School Psychology, Fourth Edition (pp. 522-546). Hoboken, NJ: Wiley.

* Moses, A. M., & Duke, N. K. (2008). Portrayals of print literacy in children’s television programming. Journal of Literacy Research40, 251-289.

* Shedd, M. K., & Duke, N. K. (2008). The power of planning: Developing effective read-alouds. Young Children63(6), 22-27. Reprinted with study guide in D. Korelek (Ed.) (2009). Spotlight on teaching preschoolers (pp. 26- 32). Washington, DC: National Association for the Education of Young Children.

Duke, N. K., & Martin, N. M. (2008). Comprehension instruction in action: The elementary classroom. In C. C. Block & S. Parris (Eds.), Comprehension instruction: Research-based best practices (pp. 241-257). New York: Guilford.

* Zhang, S., & Duke, N. K. (2008). Strategies for Internet reading with different reading purposes: A descriptive study of twelve good Internet readers. Journal of Literacy Research, 40, 128-162.

Bennett-Armistead, V. S., Duke, N. K., & Moses, A. M. (2007, February/March). Beyond Bedtime Stories. Parent and Child. Excerpt reprinted from Bennett-Armistead, V. S., Duke, N. K., & Moses, A. M. (2007). Beyond bedtime stories: A parent’s guide to promoting reading, writing, and other literacy skills from birth to 5. New York: Scholastic.

Bennett-Armistead, V. S., Duke, N. K., & Moses, A. M. (2007). To correct or not correct: The answer may surprise you. Young Children, 61(1), 41. Excerpt reprinted from Bennett-Armistead, V. S., Duke, N. K., & Moses, A. M. (2005). Literacy and the youngest learner: Best practices for educators of children from birth to five. New York: Scholastic.

Duke, N. K. (2007). Let’s look in a book: Using nonfiction texts for reference with young children. Young Children, 62, 12-16.

* Purcell-Gates, V., Duke, N. K., & Martineau, J. A. (2007). Learning to read and write genre-specific text: Roles of authentic experience and explicit teaching. Reading Research Quarterly42, 8-45.

* Duke, N. K., Purcell-Gates, V., Hall, L. A., & Tower, C. (2006/2007). Authentic literacy activities for developing comprehension and writing. The Reading Teacher, 60, 344-355.Reprinted in R. M. Bean, N. Heisey, and C. M. Roller (Eds.), Preparing reading professionals (second edition) (2010). Newark, DE: International Reading Association.

Duke, N. K. (2006). Foreword. To A. Stead, Reality checks: Teaching reading comprehension with nonfiction. Portland, ME: Stenhouse.

Duke, N. K. (2006). Making your writing interesting. In S. B. Wepner & L. B. Gambrell (Eds.), Beating the odds: Getting published in the field of literacy (p. 111). Newark DE: International Reading Association.

Duke, N. K., & Pressley, M. (2006, May/June). Call the struggling reader helpline! Instructor, 115(8), 20, 22.

Duke, N. K., Schmar-Dobler, E., & Zhang, S. (2006). Comprehension and technology. In M. C. McKenna, L. D. Labbo, R. D. Kieffer, & D. Reinking (Eds.), International handbook of literacy and technology, Volume II (pp. 317-326). Mahwah, NJ: Erlbaum.

Duke, N. K. (2005). Comprehension of what for what: Comprehension as a non-unitary construct. In S. Paris & S. Stahl (Eds.), Current issues in reading comprehension and assessment (pp. 93-104). Mahwah, NJ: Erlbaum.

Duke, N. K. (2005). Foreword. To D. E. Paynter, E. Bodrova, & J. K. Doty, For the love of words: Vocabulary instruction that works. San Francisco: Jossey-Bass.

Duke, N. K., & Pressley, M. (2005, December/January). “How can I help my struggling readers?” Instructor, 115(4), 23-25.

Duke, N. K., & Reynolds, J. M. (2005). Learning from research: Critical understandings to guide our practice. In L. Hoyt (Ed.), Building a literacy of thoughtfulness: Focus on comprehension (pp. 9-21). Portsmouth, NH: Heinemann.

BOOKS

Duke, N. K., & Mallette, M. H. (Eds.) (expected, 2011). Literacy research methodologies, second edition. New York: Guilford Press.

Bennett-Armistead, V. S., Duke, N. K., & Moses, A. M. (2007). Beyond bedtime stories: A parent’s guide to promoting reading, writing, and other literacy skills from birth to 5. New York: Scholastic.

Bennett-Armistead, V. S., Duke, N. K., & Moses, A. M. (2005). Literacy and the youngest learner: Best practices for educators of children from birth to five. New York: Scholastic.

Duke, N. K., & Mallette, M. H. (Eds.) (2004). Literacy research methodologies. New York: Guilford Press.

Duke, N. K. (2003). A bat and a rat. New York: Scholastic.

Duke, N. K. (2003). We work together. New York: Scholastic.

Duke, N. K., & Bennett-Armistead, V. S., with Huxley, A., Johnson, M., McLurkin, D., Roberts, E., Rosen, C., Vogel, E. (2003). Reading and writing informational text in the primary grades: Research-based practices. New York: Scholastic.

OTHER PUBLICATIONS

Shanahan, T., Callison, K., Carriere, C., Duke, N. K., Pearson, P. D., Schatschneider, C., & Torgesen, J. (2010). Improving reading comprehension in kindergarten through 3rd grade: A practice guide (NCEE 2010-4038). Washington, DC: National Center for Education Evaluation and Regional Assistance, Institute of Education Sciences, U.S. Department of Education. Retrieved from whatworks.ed.gov/publications/practiceguides.

Billman, A. K., Duke, N. K., Hilden, K. R., Zhang, S., Roberts, K., Halladay, J. L., Martin, N. M., & Schaal, A. M. (2008). Concepts of Comprehension Assessment (COCA). Retrieved June 18, 2008 from http://www.msularc.org/html/project_COCA_main.html.

Hilden, K. R., Duke, N. K., Billman, A. K., Zhang, S., Halladay, J. L., Schaal, A. M., Roberts, K., & Martin, N. M. (2008). Informational Strategic Cloze Assessment (ISCA). Retrieved June 18, 2008 from http://www.msularc.org/html/project_ISCA_main.html.

 

Duke, N. K., Moses, A. M., Billman, A. K., Zhang, S., & Bennett-Armistead, V. S. (2006). Promoting emergent literacy in licensed care [video recording and booklet]. East Lansing, MI: Michigan State University. [under contract to be revised for national publication through Scholastic, Incorporated]

Duke, N. K. (1999). The scarcity of informational texts in first grade. Center for the Improvement of Early Reading Achievement Technical Report #1-007.